Volunteers shave head for pediatric cancer
27 March 2007

Jeanne Belman, left, of Fairmont City gets her head shaved by hair stylist Michelle Boone of Belleville, Illinous, USA. Also shown getting his hair clipped is Doug Hokeness of Oakville. The two were among more than a hundred who lost their locks to raise money at the St. Baldrick's Foundation fundraiser at Shenanigan's bar in Belleville Saturday. In the backround, top left, is a photo of honoree Ella Prickett. (Belleville Democrat News, 2007)Jeanne Belman, left, of Fairmont City gets her head shaved by hair stylist Michelle Boone of Belleville, Illinous, USA. Also shown getting his hair clipped is Doug Hokeness of Oakville. The two were among more than a hundred who lost their locks to raise money at the St. Baldrick's Foundation fundraiser at Shenanigan's bar in Belleville Saturday. In the backround, top left, is a photo of honoree Ella Prickett. (Belleville Democrat News, 2007)
Chicago, USA: Some volunteers have lost their hair – temporarily, at least – but they've also proven they're big-hearted.

The volunteers shaved their heads at several St. Baldrick's events in Chicago and throughout 10 countries, to raise money for pediatric cancer research.

The hair was flying at the University of Illinois at Chicago on Tuesday morning, as volunteers went under the razor. The tables turned for one nurse, Jessica, when a cancer patient whose head she had shaved, carefully chopped off her curly locks.

In next to no time, Jessica was in solidarity with the patients she cares so much about.

"They're not just her to be on TV. They're here for us, and I think it's wonderful, the nurse – and God bless her; I don't know if I could do that if I had hair," said cancer patient Darlene Felten. "But I think it's great. It's for a wonderful cause and it helps a lot of people."

"It means a lot to see that people are caring – people that don't even know you are caring about you," added cancer patient Josh Crosby, "so it means a lot."

Doctors, children, police officers and firefighters all took part in the event, which has raised more than $20 million.

In 1970, only 4 percent of kids facing childhood leukemia made it through. Fundraisers like St. Baldrick's have helped bring the cure rate to 80 percent.

"Right now, I'm going through chemo and I'm almost done," said Max Stine. "I'm doing much better. It's almost done, and it's working."

"The extra survival that comes in from research supported by efforts like this is the difference of hundreds of lives every year," said Dr. Paul Kent of Rush University Medical Center. "So an event like this – the people who were brave enough to do this today are literally saving children's lives.

So if you spot someone with a fresh shave up top, be sure to give them a pat on the back, or visit the links in the right column to see how you can help in the fight against childhood cancer.

St. Baldrick's began as a casual conversation between friends and became the world's biggest volunteer-driven fundraising program for childhood cancer. Events have taken place in 10 countries and 42 US states, raising over $20 million, and shaving more than 26,000 heads.


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