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Indian volunteers respond to train explosion
12 July 2006

A blood donor gives her blood sample at the KEM Hospital in Bombay, India, Wednesday, July 12, 2006. As the death toll from Tuesday's devastating explosions rose to 200, railroad tracks had been cleared of debris, platforms washed clean of blood and commuters were back riding the suburban trains. (AP Photo/Gurinder Osan)A blood donor gives her blood sample at the KEM Hospital in Bombay, India, Wednesday, July 12, 2006. As the death toll from Tuesday's devastating explosions rose to 200, railroad tracks had been cleared of debris, platforms washed clean of blood and commuters were back riding the suburban trains. (AP Photo/Gurinder Osan)
Mumbai, India: Indian Red Cross volunteers responded immediately to the explosions that rocked Mumbai's railway during yesterday's rush hour, killing at least 180. More than 300 people were also injured in the blasts, which ripped doors and windows off  carriages and threw passengers from trains.

Many people suffered severe cuts and burns, while others suffered severe shock. At the Indian government's request in Maharastra, local Red Cross volunteers and staff were immediately mobilized to provide first aid to the injured and help take care of incoming patients at the Sion hospital in central Mumbai.

Dozens of trained Red Cross volunteers have been travelling in ambulances between the different train stations hit by the explosions, helping to transport people to hospitals and taking bodies to the city's mortuaries.

The volunteers have also been working to contact family members of people who were killed or hurt in the blasts.

So far, the Maharastra Red Cross branch has provided 37 units of blood to the Bhava hospital.

Mumbai, previously known as Bombay, is India's financial capital. The city's suburban train system carries more than six million people each day, making it one of the busiest commuter lines in the world.